100% natural with scientific validation

The BioOrg Method transforms groundbreaking scientific research in microbiology into a new understanding of well-being for individuals and organizations. Thus, thanks to the ideas of Prof. Graham Rook (Clinical Microbiology, University College London) and continued collaboration with several Belgian universities, we can deliver the positive power of bacteria safely and effectively.

“One sometimes finds what one is not looking for.” Alexander Fleming (1881 – 1955)

Old friends do better

A selection of forest champions

Dr Ir. Filip Willocx of BioOrg has spent years researching benign bacterial strains in various biotopes such as forests, aquatic environments and grasslands. Based on the knowledge acquired, he selected 11 species with a proven bioremedial effect in the metabolism of various organic pollutants (particles, VOCs) and the release of adhesive layers that retain visible pollution. Each species has also been tested for its safety and ability to work together.

Old friends do better

A selection of forest champions

Dr Ir. Filip Willocx of BioOrg has spent years researching benign bacterial strains in various biotopes such as forests, aquatic environments and grasslands. Based on the knowledge acquired, he selected 11 species with a proven bioremedial effect in the metabolism of various organic pollutants (particles, VOCs) and the release of adhesive layers that retain visible pollution. Each species has also been tested for its safety and ability to work together.

Heterotrophic purification

Our protective ecosystem feeds on dirt and harmful substances

In terms of energy supply, organisms are divided into two categories: “autotrophic” and “heterotrophic”. Where the former group derives its energy from the conversion of sunlight (think plants), heterotrophic organisms live on food from outside their own bodies. BioOrg bacteria belong to the second category and feed on specific polluting substances, even those harmful to humans: dust particles, particles such as PM2.5 and PM10, harmful hydrocarbons such as acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, methacrylate, acrylonitrile.

Bacteria are part of us, and the balance of bacteria in our environment is essential to our good health.

Almost all living things are inhabited by microorganisms (microbiota) and exposed to countless other organisms. These microorganisms influence the development and function of almost all organic systems. For example, bacteria contribute to our evolution, while protecting us from other pathogenic microorganisms and toxins in our environment.

Humans, animals, and plants have a similar relationship with microbes. Research shows the influence of microbial ecosystems on the health of organisms and highlights links between the diversity of microorganisms in the environment and internal microbiology and good health.

Heritage, lifestyle (diet, drug consumption) and exposure to the natural environment affect the composition of our microbiota, which affects our health through the balance of interconnected physiological systems. Such as regulating our immune system or brain functions

Dr. Jessica Green: "Good bacteria make healthy buildings."

Everything around us is covered with an invisible layer, an ecosystem of microorganisms (microbiota). Our desks, our computers, our pencils and pens, and our buildings are home to microbiological landscapes, like invisible landscapes. We need to think about how this microbiological landscape interacts with our microbiome.

 

According to Jessica Green, it is necessary and possible to design our environments in such a way that the microbiological landscapes around us benefit our health. How can we make the spaces that surround us microbiologically favorable to good microorganisms? Jessica Green notes that many of our decisions are made based on the visible world around us. However, a lot of things in our life are determined by things that we cannot perceive. Jessica’s research center wants to teach everyone to understand the impact of bacteria, ecology and evolution in our daily lives.

Jessica Green is a professor of biology at the University of Oregon in the United States, where she is a member of the Biology and Built Environment Center (BioBE).

She is also a visiting professor at the Institut Santa Fé. Jessica has received several awards throughout her career, including the Blaise Pascal International Research Chair.

Do not hesitate to try the BioOrg purification

You don’t have to take our word for it. Request your free demonstration and find out how BioOrg ensures a healthy indoor environment in your home.

BIOORG SCIENTIFIC PARTNERS

BioOrg works together with numerous Belgian research groups and universities to optimize its services.

KULeuven
  • Prof. Dr. Lode Godderis
  • Prof. Dr. Johan Neyts
  • Prof. Dr. ir. Wouter Saeys
  • Prof. Dr. ir. Hans Steenackers
  • Prof. Dr. ir. Chris Michiels
Imec
  • Dr. Andy Lambrechts (I2 – IMEC)
UAntwerpen
  • Prof. Dr. ir. Sarah Lebeer
  • Baekelandmandaat Max De Keukeleire
  • Prof. Dr. Geert Van der Snickt
Hogere Zeevaartschool
  • Dr. Olivier Schalm
UCLL Campus Diepenbeek
  • Dr. ir. Ilse Vermeulen en Dr. ir. Lore Castelein
Eu.reca
  •  BioOrg is a proud member of the European Respiratory Cluster Antwerp (Eu.reca)
Vito
  • Marianne Stranger

Do you only see that one tree that hides the forest?

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